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Kenya and South Sudan sign peace MoU

The Kenyan government and the South Sudan government have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to promote peace and allow for the construction of a road at Nadapal, at the border of the two countries.

The MoU was signed by governor Josphat Nanok, and his Southern equatorial state counterpart Louis Lobong, Petroleum and Mining Cabinet Secretary John Munyes, and Turkana county commissioner Muthama Wambua to unlock the stalemate that had stalled the construction of the road at the border.

The security teams from both countries on Saturday also traveled to Nadapal at the border of the two countries to share the resolutions with the communities living at the border.

Under the MOU, the security teams from the two countries will provide security to the contractor to ensure the road is completed by February next year without any hitches.

In addition, labour will be drawn from the Turkana and Toposa communities.

Lobong said the agreement will help improve the security along the border.

“We have passed the message with communities living along the border on our resolutions and asked them to support the peace so that the construction of the road at Nadapal border is completed,” said Lobong.

The Turkana county commissioner said the agreement had also helped address the concerns of 300 transporters who had planned to visit him and the South Sudan officials over insecurity and the poor state of the road at the border.

“This understanding has addressed the concerns of the transporters who were planning to come to my office due to the poor state of the road and insecurity cases,” said Wambua.

He also called on the communities to avoid carrying illegal firearms and embrace business.

“No one wins during the cattle thefts. You steal today and are robbed tomorrow. We should embrace business because we all win by engaging in business,” said Wambua.

At the same time the county commissioner said a team of 50 people each from Turkana and Toposa communities will be taken to Namanga, Isibania and Malaba border on October 9 to learn how the communities living along the borders coexist.

“They will be able to learn how the Maasais cross over to Tanzania during drought and live peacefully. They will also be taught how the Maasai fatten their livestock,” said Wambua.

By: KBC

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